Information

Haworthia turgida

Haworthia turgida


Scientific Name

Haworthia turgida Haw.

Synonyms

Haworthia turgida var. turgida, Aloe laetevirens, Aloe turgida, Catevala laetevirens, Catevala turgida, Haworthia caespitosa, Haworthia laetevirens

Scientific Classification

Family: Asphodelaceae
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Tribe: Aloeae
Genus: Haworthia

Description

Haworthia turgida is a small succulent that varies in growth habit, leaf size, shape, and texture. It forms rosettes of glossy green leaves with "crystalline" textures. The rosettes grow up to 4 inches (10 cm) in diameter. Leaves are recurved at the tip, which is translucent and marked with green lines. They become reddish in strong sunlight. This succulent offsets freely to form small clusters quickly. In spring, mature rosettes produce single, upright and wiry stems carrying tiny, tubular, and white flowers.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 10a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

These succulents are not considered difficult houseplants to grow. If you can keep a pot of Aloe alive on a windowsill, chances are you can do the same with a dish of Haworthia. As with all succulents, the most dangerous situation is too much water. They should never be allowed to sit in water under any circumstances. At the same time, these decorative, little plants can be grown in interesting containers such as teacups and even miniature baby shoes. If you're given a Haworthia in such a container, make sure the container had adequate drainage.

Haworthias are small, usually remaining between 3 and 5 inches (7.5 cm and 12.5 cm) in height, and relatively slow-growing. They are often grown in small clusters in wide, shallow dishes. Over time, clusters will naturally enlarge as the mother plant sends off small plantlets. When the cluster has outgrown its dish, repot in the spring or early summer into a new wide and shallow dish with fresh potting soil. This is also the time to take offsets for propagation.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Haworthia.

Origin

Haworthia turgida is native to the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

Varieties

  • Haworthia turgida var. longibracteata
  • Haworthia turgida var. suberecta

Links

  • Back to genus Haworthia
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Care and Propagation Information

General Care for Haworthia turgida

Haworthia turgida grows well in either container gardens, or outdoors. If grown in the ground, its offsets create clumps and spreads out in a mat.

Watering

Haworthia turgida has typical watering needs for a succulent. It’s best to use the “soak and dry” method, and allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings.

Where to Plant

Haworthia turgida is not cold hardy, so if you live in a zone that gets colder than 30° F (-1.1° C), it’s best to plant this succulent in a container that can be brought indoors. It does well in full to partial sun.

Plant in an area of your garden that gets 6 hours of sunlight a day. If planting indoors, place in a room that gets a lot of sunlight, such as near a southern-facing window (if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere).

How to Propagate Haworthia turgida

Haworthia turgida will produce small offsets, sprouting up around the base of the plant. Simply pull these up and allow the offsets to dry for one to two days before replanting in well-draining soil.


Product Details

Highlights

Haworthia turgida var. turgida (also known as H. laetivirens) (Bayer): Thick green rosette with striped, flattened leaf tips. The leaf tops have translucent "leaf windows" that let in light and help the plant tolerate low light conditions.

Haworthia are able to tolerate low, indoor light, making them excellent houseplants, even for beginners. They are particularly easy to grow and rarely affected by common succulent pests and diseases. Strong, drought-tolerant roots will grow if they have great drainage and infrequent water. Pick deep containers with drainage holes and a gritty, well-draining soil that is 50% to 70% mineral grit (coarse sand, pumice, or perlite). Water deeply enough for water to run out the drainage hole and allow the soil to completely dry before watering again.

This genus tolerates high heat by slowing down and eventually going dormant in the peak of summer. This means that, unlike other succulents, it is important not to over-water or fertilize during summer dormancy and water a bit more frequently in the winter growing season. Haworthia are slow growers and tend to stay small in pots, but they will produce new offsets in clumps around their bases. These offsets can be left to develop into a dense clump or pulled off and transplanted.


Watch the video: IDENTIFICAÇÃO DE MINHAS HAWORTHIAS E HAWORTHIOPSIS